Possible Link Between Sugary Drinks, Cancer
PARIS (Dispatches) -- Findings from a new study suggest that limiting sugary drinks might contribute to a reduction in cancer cases, say researchers.
So a team of researchers based in France set out to assess the associations between the
associations between the consumption of sugary drinks (sugar sweetened beverages and 100%
fruit juices), artificially sweetened (diet) beverages, and risk of overall cancer, as well as breast,
prostate, and bowel (colorectal) cancers.
Participants completed at least two 24-hour online validated dietary questionnaires, designed to
measure usual intake of 3,300 different food and beverage items and were followed up for a
maximum of 9 years (2009-2018).

The results show that a 100 mL per day increase in the consumption of sugary drinks was
associated with an 18% increased risk of overall cancer and a 22% increased risk of breast
cancer. When the group of sugary drinks was split into fruit juices and other sugary drinks, the
consumption of both beverage types was associated with a higher risk of overall cancer. No
association was found for prostate and colorectal cancers, but numbers of cases were more
limited for these cancer locations.