Friday 21 September 2018
News ID: 57320
Publish Date: 12 September 2018 - 21:46
LONDON (Reuters) -- A group of about 50 lawmakers in British Prime Minister Theresa May's government who oppose her proposals for a post-Brexit deal with the European Union have met to discuss how and when they could force her out of her job, the BBC reported on Wednesday.
The lawmakers, part of the European Research Group (ERG), an anti-EU grouping in May's Conservative party, met on Tuesday night and openly discussed May's future as leader, the BBC said citing an unnamed source.
A number at the meeting said they had already submitted letters of no confidence in May, the source told the BBC. Under Conservative rules, a leadership election is triggered if 15 percent of Conservative lawmakers, currently 48, demand a vote of no confidence.
The ERG has condemned May's plans for Britain to remain in a free trade zone for goods with the EU after it leaves the bloc in March next year, but has faced criticism itself for failing to suggest a detailed alternative.

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CARACAS (Dispatches) -- Pro-government supporters have marched against U.S. meddling after reports that American officials met secretly with Venezuelan military officers to discuss plans to oust President Nicolas Maduro.
The United States "acknowledges having met at least three times with military coup leaders to carry out a coup," said Diosdado Cabello, speaker of the ruling Constituent Assembly that runs the country.
At an event by the ruling United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV), Cabello also drew a direct connection with the drone explosions on August 4 at a military parade Maduro was leading. "The presidential assassination that was stopped was led by the United States. Is there anyone who has any doubt?" Cabello asked.
U.S. officials decided against taking action after the meetings, according to The New York Times.
On Twitter, Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza said it was "absolutely unacceptable and unjustifiable that U.S. government officials participate in meetings to encourage and promote violent actions of extremists."

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KUALA LUMPUR (AP) -- Officials say Malaysia's prime minister-in-waiting Anwar Ibrahim will contest a by-election that will pave the way for his return to active politics.
Lawmaker Danyal Balagopal Abdullah said Wednesday he has resigned as a member of Parliament in Port Dickson, a southern coastal town, to make way for Anwar's comeback. The Election Commission must set a date for by-election within two months.
The 70-year-old Anwar is the anointed successor to Prime Minister Mahathir Mohammad, who won a historic national vote in May.
Senior party official Saifuddin Nasution says there is no timeframe for Anwar to take over the top job. He says Anwar will focus on parliamentary reforms and will not hold any government position when he returns to Parliament.

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VLADIVOSTOK, Russia (Reuters) -- Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un could visit Russia at any time that was convenient for him.
Putin's comments came days after the Kremlin said it had sent Kim Jong Un a letter of invitation to visit Russia.

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BRUSSELS (AP) -- European authorities are planning to slap internet companies like Google and Facebook with big fines if they don't take down extremist content within one hour.
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said in a speech Wednesday that the Commission is proposing the new rules as part of efforts to step up the bloc's security.
He said that removing material within an hour is important because it's "the critical window in which the greatest damage is done."
The EU's executive body said extremist material "that prepares, incites or glorifies acts of terrorism" must be taken offline. Content would be flagged up by national authorities, who would issue removal orders to the internet companies hosting it. Those companies would be given one hour to delete it.

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ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) -- World hunger rose in 2017 for a third consecutive year, fueled by conflict and climate change, the United Nations warned, jeopardizing a global goal to end the scourge by 2030.
Hunger appears to be increasing in almost all of Africa and in South America, with 821 million people - one in nine - going hungry in 2017, according to the State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018 report.
Meanwhile, 672 million adults - more than one in eight - are now obese, up from 600 million in 2014.
"Without increased efforts, there is a risk of falling far short of achieving the SDG target of hunger eradication by 2030,” the report said, referring to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, adopted by member nations in 2015.
It was the third year in a row that global hunger levels have increased, following a decade of declines.
 





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